Read our tiny stories from Compass Senior Living

Tiny Stories™

"If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten."

- Rudyard Kipling

The Power to Transform

Stories have power. They delight, enchant, touch, teach, recall, inspire, motivate, and challenge. They help us understand. They imprint a picture on our minds. Our storytelling ability, a uniquely human trait, has been with us as long as we’ve been able to speak and listen. Not only do people love to tell stories, people love to hear stories!

That’s why we’ve partnered with Carrie Gallahan, founder of Saving Libraries. Carrie was inspired by this African proverb to start a movement to save the stories of our elders.

African proverb

Compass Senior Living

541-636-3460

1580 Valley River Dr #260 Eugene, OR 97401

Community Tiny Stories

We have a unique opportunity to harvest the wisdom, the humor and memories we hear every day. We live and work beside elders who have journeyed almost a full century on this planet. Through their stories, we connect with one another while giving our resident storytellers the opportunity to reconnect with what was once taken for granted. We give them the opportunity to share their memories for generations to come.

Through the simple process of capturing these memories, or tiny stories, we create a profoundly enriching experience for both the storyteller and the recorder. Elders tell their stories of adventures, challenges, and wisdom acquired along their life journey. Deeper connections are made. And, the tiny stories can be preserved forever on digital media and libraries.

Grammie​

Click to read the transcript

Irene: I was born in a log cabin down there in the country. We had the old local doctor, Fred Murray, and he one time told me. He had a real cracky voice, and he said, “I had the choice to make whether you would live or die.” And if my mom had been living now it would have been Caesarean, definitely. But, he said that, and he told me one time I was born in “tater diggin” time. [laughs] He was comical, he was a comical old guy. He had a real cracky voice. [laughs]cracky voice, and he said, “I had the choice to make whether you would live or die.” And if my mom had been living now it would have been Caesarean, definitely. But, he said that, and he told me one time I was born in “tater diggin” time. [laughs] He was comical, he was a comical old guy. He had a real cracky voice. [laughs]
Carrie: You were born in what? What did he say?
Irene: Tater digging time! October.

Grammie

...and he said, “I had the choice to make whether you would live or die.” 

Bob Brophy

Bob Brophy was a beloved resident at Peachtree Village Retirement in Roswell, New Mexico. He loved telling his stories and passionate about sharing them—with anyone that would listen. We’re certain that Bob would say thank you for listening. 

Carol Steyaert

You would never know that there was a depression. My mom could really make good stuff.

Carol: I was born in ’28 and the depression was in the ‘30’s. I remember my mom and dad always had a little insurance policy. I don’t know how old I was. I wasn’t very old maybe 4 or 5 something like that. And I remember an insurance man, Mr. Mellencamp  (not that it makes any difference to you guys) , but anyway, he came, and they’d come once every so month’s for the payment. That’s how they did it then in my little town. I can remember mother not having the money. So He said “Well “ (isn’t that funny that I can remember that?)  He said, “Is there any way you can borrow something or sell something Sadie? “ She said ‘Yes, I think so, can you come back next week?” He said, “Oh yeh.” What she did - she sold her engagement ring so she would have enough. It was a thousand dollars on each kid or something like that. It has been so long I don’t remember. When I got to be 21, I believe, 18 or 21 we turned the policies back to Mom and Dad so they could have their money. But At the time they wanted the money. That popped into my mind when you said the depression because we were never without food. Never. Always had something. You would never know that there was a depression. My mom could really make good stuff.

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Denise Kalkwarf

His foot was so sore he didn’t ever want me to darn his socks. And I didn’t!

Denise: When we first got married, my husband wanted me to darn his socks. I had never darned socks. But his mother darned socks. So, one day I worked real hard darning the sock for him you know. And he wore it. His foot was so sore he didn’t ever want me to darn his socks. And I didn’t!

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Dorothy Romey

I was at my sister’s piano recital. It was on December 7th, 1941.​

Dorothy: I was at my sister’s piano recital. It was on December 7th, 1941. And we had not heard it until we got there and everyone was talking about it, and let’s see - I would have been - 17. And I thought, 'OH! What is going on?' That’s where I was, at my sister’s piano recital. It was a Sunday.

Interviewer: Did it personally affect you?

Dorothy: Well, it did later. It did a full day later.

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Edith Felter

“Why can’t I have a department?” He said “because we need you to do what you are doing.” Because I had to do every job they sent me to.

 Edith: I mean I had both jobs when I got out of high school I worked in a local department store. Everybody had a department but me, and I asked the boss one day, I said, “Why can’t I have a department?” He said “because we need you to do what you are doing.” Because I had to do every job they sent me to. Well, I finally got into the millinery department, and I marked hats to sell. We had a maid that would come up to get our merchandise and take it down. One day I marked all these hats wrong, and didn’t discover it until they were gone. So I told the boss and told him what I had done, and he sent the maid to get them. And the minute she started picking them hats up, the women came around and wouldn’t let her take them, and they paid the big – the wrong price. They thought they were getting a real bargain! I don’t know how many she ever got, but that was a boo boo that made them money!!

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Nancy Ayers

We had a grand piano in the living room and so these performers would sleep all morning and would come afternoon and they would rehearse in the living room or on the front porch. What I liked the best was the tumbling acts!

"Well, I guess you could say my mother and father were married in ’29. He couldn’t keep a job, you know, there just weren’t that many. He was in sales, and he simply couldn’t support her or me. So they divorced and so my mother and I lived with my grandparents. Then my grandfather died when I was four. Then it was kind of tough. We had a big house and had lots of bedrooms upstairs, so my grandmother rented out rooms to the performers that performed in one of two dinner and nightclubs in Phoenix in those days. It was right across the street from us at the end of Central Avenue. That is some of my fondest memories. We had a grand piano in the living room and so these performers would sleep all morning and would come afternoon and they would rehearse in the living room or on the front porch. What I liked the best was the tumbling acts! They would come and they would do that on our front porch, and it was fun to watch.

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California

Alberta (Bertie) Whipple

He kept saying, “June come here! June come here!” She came all the way in the house, and he said, “I messed the bed.” She started having a big fit about it, and he said, “April Fool.”

Bertie: I wanted to learn how to bake bread. I said mom, “Give me the recipe on how to bake bread.” She said “Bertie all I know is that I use a pinch of this and a pinch of that”, and she had no idea how to tell me. So I baked my first bread out of a Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook. It said I’ve got to keep it warm. So I had a heater that would go on real hot and then it would cool off. I put my bread on there - well it killed the yeast - so when I baked it, it was like a brick. If you dropped it on your toe it would break. My husband went ahead and ate that bread because he did not want me to be discouraged in baking. So I learned how to bake, and kept asking neighbors and friends and relatives and then I started baking bread nine loaves at a time and I ended up giving them to the neighbors and so I thought, “I am going to teach them how to bake bread. I am not going to do this anymore.” And that’s what I did.

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Eunice Hess

She not only took care of the house, but we had a theater. She took care of seeing all of the salesmen that came to town and choosing the pictures that would be shown. She absolutely would not show any pictures that weren’t suitable for the family.

Eunice: She kept so busy. She not only took care of the house, but we had a theater. She took care of seeing all of the salesmen that came to town and choosing the pictures that would be shown. She absolutely would not show any pictures that weren’t suitable for the family. When we started out actually they were silent movies. So, she was kept very busy and was very responsible.

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Fanny Scott

I was, let me see…I was the third. I have no family story about her. She was just a beautiful good mother.

Interviewer: Fanny, tell us about your Mom. What was her name?

Fanny: Barbara, her maiden name was ( ) and When she got married, her name was ( ). That was her name. She was the best mother that somebody could have. Hard working. She did the best that she could do.

Interviewer: How many children were in your family?

Fanny: Five. Two brothers and three sisters. I was, let me see…I was the third. I have no family story about her. She was just a beautiful good mother.

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Jay Anderson

Somebody made a dugout canoe out of a log and they just left it on the lake. Every spring we would go out there and search it for. We found it, we would make an oar.

Jay: I grew up in Chester California up in the mountains near Lake Almanor. In the summertime we went out on the lake we swam and fished. One other thing I wanted to mention. Somebody made a dugout canoe out of a log and they just left it on the lake. Every spring we would go out there and search it for. We found it, we would make an oar.

Interviewer: How many summers did you find it?

Jay: About three or four.

Interviewer: Did a man carve it out?

Jay: I think so. We blamed it on an Indian.

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Kay Swenson

If I remember right, one was French and the other was Italian.  I think my dad was Italian and my mom was French, I think.

Kay: If I remember right, one was French and the other was Italian. I think my dad was Italian and my mom was French, I think.

Interviewer: What was your mom’s name?

Kay: Marguerite Marie Cecile Martin.

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Laurette Friedman

One of my memories was that we treated ourselves, and we went to what was then – I don’t even know if it still exists - the 5 o’clock club in New York.

Laurette: We just went out together. Both boys were in school, and we did not have much money, but we treated ourselves. One of my memories was that we treated ourselves, and we went to what was then – I don’t even know if it still exists - the 5 o’clock club in New York. We went out. We treated ourselves. We went out to dinner at this 5 o’clock club. We had a ball.

Interviewer: Did you like to Dance?

Laurette: Oh yes. We loved to go dancing!​

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Margaret (Jo) Duckett

Interviewer:  Anything else you remember from your summers?

Jo:  Just that everything was wonderful!

Jo: She was listening. She loved to listen. She always, always wanting to find out what other people are saying.

Interviewer: How many children did she have?

Jo: Four children. Having contributions to make. That was an important thing.

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Margaret Ahlstrom

My father made olive oil. My mother didn’t have a regular income.  It was an annual thing rather than a weekly or monthly deal.

Margaret: She had been a teacher and a principal. I only had one brother no sisters, just the two of us. My father made olive oil. My mother didn’t have a regular income. It was an annual thing rather than a weekly or monthly deal. We made it. We just bought what we had to buy and used what we had. She was very intelligent. She had been a high school principal before she married. She was good in math. My brother and I were both good in math. We had a lot of books. They liked to travel. My folks liked to travel, and see the country.

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Mary Christopherson

Well, the watermelon man was my dad, Lloyd Thomas.  

Mary: Well, the watermelon man was my dad, Lloyd Thomas. People miles around would plan on certain times of the day or something that they could arrange to go the store or go shopping or whatever – they would make a point of stopping at the Tower place. The thing is, that if Lloyd had any melons for sale, hopefully to give away – which we often did. The temperature there was sometimes between 125 or 130 in the shade. It was bit warm. It was Missouri.

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Mozelle Hood

But I never learned to be a good swimmer, so how my mother got through that I don’t know.

Mozelle: I remember picking cherries in the summer when my father went to do farm work, so we usually lived on a farm somewhere. It varied a lot. We had a big irrigation ditch behind the house, and we kids used to sneak off there and go swimming. But I never learned to be a good swimmer, so how my mother got through that I don’t know. It was good. It was fun. If we weren’t picking cherries, we were doing something else. Helping my mother can. I still remember those dirty fruit jars we had to wash.

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Pauline Loughlin

She took all of the kids in the neighborhood bread and jelly whenever they were over there playing.  They were always over there playing.

Pauline: When we lived in Boise we had a lot of Basque neighbors. They are good people, but they are different. This one guy, he was a herder, and he was never home but his wife was always home. I can’t remember….he had a first name. She took all of the kids in the neighborhood bread and jelly whenever they were over there playing. They were always over there playing. She had a pan about this big around and about that thick that she baked her bread in. She would dump it out on a board, and she would pick the board up and hold it up under her chin like this, and she had a butcher knife that looked like it could kill elephants. She always cut it like this. I though oh my! She was a big breasted lady, oh my god, she is going to have trouble! But she never did.

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Willa (Billie) Gregory

But every evening mother would get us all around, and we had a fireplace. She would pop a great big pan of popcorn and we would sit around the fireplace, and she would read to all of us. We all sat and listened to her read.  

Billie: When you are raising your family; and I couldn’t work at that time because I couldn’t drive. I had just bought new bedspreads for their bed, and I was so proud of them. My niece, I kept her for a little while that day, and all three of them were in the bedroom playing, and they had a little toy tool set with a little hammer. She came down on the bedspread with that hammer, and put a 3-corner tear in that bedspread. She felt bad about it. Ron was the middle one. My older son and my niece, they decided to blame the little brother. I was so upset because you know, you didn’t have money every day to buy new bedspreads for two beds. I made Ron come in and sit on a chair for punishment because he tore my bedspread. He kept crying, “I didn’t do it, I didn’t do it, I didn’t do it.” That went on for a long time. And you know, we know our kids, and I thought, “That isn’t like Ron to keep saying he didn’t do something when he had done it.” He was stubborn and he would not give up that he had done that. Finally I said, “Ok Jim and Susan come in here. Ron is saying that he did not do that.” They told me the truth then. I had already spanked him for doing it. Oh, I felt like I was so bad. They have never let me forget that. Susan said “Aunt Billie, you shouldn’t have punished us because it was an accident.” I said, “Yes but we didn’t have money to buy new ones.” Kids are so funny.

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Idaho

Bruce Bailey

I built a dune buggy one time. It broke in half. It was flying through the air and come down and it goes ‘umph’. (laughs) Right In the middle.

Bruce: I built a dune buggy one time. It broke in half. It was flying through the air and come down and it goes ‘umph’. (laughs) Right In the middle. This friend of mine and I took another friend – we went out north of Eagle out to the foothills, running all over, just having a ball up this hill. Bang! It broke in half, and it shivered to a stop. This one guy that was with us; he obviously hadn’t done much in his life – he said he was going to have to walk out of there. Well I walked down to the pick-up, thank God it wasn’t very far. Down to the pick-up and the trailer. We got it back on the trailer with some chains and come-alongs and stuff. Got it on the trailer. I took it home, and bolted it back together and that was the end of result. I tell you, I wonder why we did some stupid stuff. At least it lit right side up. It didn’t have any roll bar on it. I don’t know that I ever went over another hill like that, where you went up like this and then the hill stopped and you kept going. Pretty quick, you know, you lose your momentum and you gotta come down. The front end turned over and it lit flat on the ground and broke right in the middle, where I put it together to start with. I didn’t quite put it together good enough, I guess. I hadn’t planned on doing that.

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Dena Hale

He made ice cream, and people would stop by when they knew he was making ice cream. He’d give them pieces of waxed paper, and they would eat it off of that. It was good.

 

Dena: My father – we lived in Star Valley, Wyoming, where my Dad started the first dairy there. He used to get his milk and cream from the experiment farm. He started making ice cream. It was fun, the way he made the ice cream. It was made in a round ice cream freezer type. It was one that kind of laid on its side, ‘cause it was made to watch. When it got to where it was thick, you could open the door on the front a little bit, and it would come out. Oh! It was good. It was all soft ice cream. I used to love that. And then he’d have little papers from wrapping butter and you put that underneath and it would just drop right on there, and you could eat it right off of that, all over. He made ice cream, and people would stop by when they knew he was making ice cream. He’d give them pieces of waxed paper, and they would eat it off of that. It was good. It was the first soft ice cream I ever ate, and it was wonderful!

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Don Crosby

Why is it special? My Dad always sang it. He sang it years ago.

Don: Oh, please meet me tonight in the moonlight.
Oh, please meet me tonight all alone.
For I have a sad story to tell you.
It’s a story that’s never been told.
Yes, I go to the new jail tomorrow, with the cold prison walls all around.
Yes, I go to the new jail tomorrow, with my head on a pillow of stone.
Oh, I wish I had the wings of an angel.
Over these prison walls I would fly.
I would fly to the arms of my darlin’ and there I’d be willing to die.
Interviewer: When did you first hear that song? Why is it special to you?
Don: Why is it special? My Dad always sang it. He sang it years ago.
Interviewer: When you were a kid?
Don: Yes!

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Frances and Vic Beers

They didn’t want any part of dancing. They didn’t like that. We talked them into going just one time… they went that one time, and after that you couldn’t drag them away from it.

Frances:  Well there was a square dance class starting within a few weeks from the time that we heard about it.  Dorothy and I really wanted to learn. The guys didn’t want to.  They didn’t want any part of dancing.  They didn’t like that.  We talked them into going just one time, and then if they didn’t like it there would be no more.  We wouldn’t bug them anymore about it. Anyway, they went that one time, and after that you couldn’t drag them away from it. 
Interviewer:   You liked it Victor?
Victor:  Oh Yes
Frances: It had a kind of sad ending for me, because my husband died on the square dance floor.  That kind of killed it for me. But they square danced for quite a few years.

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Genevieve Clark

Then I got notice that they were going to transfer me to another facility. Neither one of us liked that idea. So we talked a little bit more and we decided, “Well, why don’t we get married?”

Genevieve: It wasn’t very long until the school superintendent came, which was a man that I knew, and wanted me to teach school. He said he came to talk to me. I said, “Well, have you talked to my husband?” He said, “Oh, it is up to you.” I thought awhile. I said, “Well, It has been a long time since I went to school, they probably won’t accept my credentials.” “Oh”, he said, I’ve already checked in to that here. OK.” So, I said “I will teach for a year.” That wasn’t true. I taught much more.

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New Mexico

Betty Meeks - The Shoe

I name the story “Rusty, Dusty, and the shoe.” I taught first grade and one day, while the children were out playing during the lunch hour I was in my room grading papers. One of my little girls came in crying and I asked her what was wrong. She said, “Rusty and Dusty got my shoe and threw it over the fence!’

So I went out with her and I went over into the vacant lot and got her shoe, brought it back and gave it to her. I was not saying a word to the boys. They had seen me come out, so they knew that I knew what had happened.

So I let them play, and when the bell rang to come in and resume classes I brought my children in, got the rest of the class seated, and assigned them some spelling words to work on. Then I took the two little boys, which were identical twins down to the Principal’s office. They stood before the Principal’s desk, and I stood beside them and told the Principal what had happened. Then I stepped behind them because I wanted him to have their full attention.

So he said, “Did you really do that to Julie?” One little twin said, “Oh we didn’t, we didn’t,” and the other one popped in and he said, “Oh yes we did!” I was so shocked and amused that I had to clamp my hand over my mouth to keep from laughing out loud.

Well the Principal went ahead and reprimanded the children, and I think he gave them a swat. Then he said, “You boys go back to your room and sit down and get to work, I want to talk to your teacher.” And so they left, and the Principal said, “Miss Meeks, in the future, when you bring children down, please do not stand behind them and laugh. Couldn’t you tell how hard it was for me to keep a straight face?” I said, “Yes, I saw it.” Well we both had a good laugh and I went back to my class.

Bob Brophy

…and here comes a sailboat south… here’s a man and woman on board stark naked sailing the ship, and He says “Hi how are you, what’s going on?” They were buck naked… I was so stunned…. It made me forget my good manners.

Bob Brophy: After the storm was over we went in on the inland. We got on the canal and went out into Virginia…oh damn, my memory is failing me, but anyway we were sailing just the two of us on a yacht going north up this canal; and here comes a sailboat south, and as we passed about 20 feet apart, here’s a man and woman on board stark naked sailing the ship, and He says “Hi how are you, what’s going on?” They were buck naked. What am I going to talk about to these people? I didn’t’ have enough good manners to wish them a good trip too. I was so stunned. I remembered that all my life. It made me forget my good manners.

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Dorothy Geary

Well, we lived on a farm and we had lots of fun. Tried to ride the horses and the cows when daddy wasn’t watching us.

Ms. Geary:  Well, we lived on a farm and we had lots of fun.  Tried to ride the horses and the cows when daddy wasn’t watching us.
Friend:  Yeh, I’ve rode a few cows.  We didn’t have any horses.  We had a mule, and it’s hard to ride a mule.
Ms. Geary:  It sure is.
Friend: They’re not a good thing to ride.
Ms. Geary:  If you don’t believe it, try riding one!

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Elzora Martin - Antarctica

 

My husband and I retired and we moved to Carlsbad for our retirement home. We belonged to a special senior citizens group down there. We invited guests from all over the world to come and talk to us and invited them to supper and so forth.

This man came from Antarctica to talk about Antarctica. When he was finished, my husband and I went to talk to him about it. He invited us to go down to Antarctica, which we did do eventually, and visit. He was a Quartermaster in the Navy.

While we were making these arrangements he told us we had to go to New Zealand—to Christ Church—where we would get transportation to fly out of New Zealand to Antarctica and also they would supply us with some clothing that we might need if we traveled around the different areas of Antarctica.

So, we made arrangements to go to New Zealand and then decided that instead of just spending that little time there we would spend three weeks.

Elzora Martin - Tasmania

I was invited to go to Tasmania with them. My husband and I were invited to go to Tasmania in a long boat and we were taking behind us a flat boat full of raw meat and meats of all kinds. These were going to the Tasmanian devils and the Tasmanian tigers, which were becoming extinct and their forest rangers were trying to raise them up again so to fill in but it never worked. They all died out eventually.

So, my husband and I were in a long boat. A long boat is an open canoe with about five men in a row. It has a wide seat and that seat, as long as you are on the long boat, is your home. If you want to go to the toilet, you have to go over the side of the boat. If you want to go to sleep, you pull up a blanket and curl up on the side of the seat.

We travelled that way for two days; from New Zealand to Tasmania. We saw the animals, we saw them being fed. We saw then being raised. Then we turned around and they gave that food that they brought for those animals. Then we turned around and came back again, also in a long boat. And, we were very very good friends with these Mauris.

Elzora Martin - Meeting Māori in New Zealand

When we go around a place, we always tried to read up about the peoples there. We also try to do some of our traveling around by bus to meet these people. We learned that the natives there were called Māori.

The Māori were not liked by the New Zealand government and they really and truly treated them abominably. My husband and I got on the bus. There were two sections and my husband had one seat in one section and I had another seat in another section. And, I happened to look at the man beside me. He looked very odd and I thought, “I bet he’s a Māori.” My husband is signaling me like mad to shut up. But, instead Elzora turns and very politely said, “I beg your pardon, but are you a Māori?” He looked at me kind of odd. And, my husband and I thought he was going to attack me right away because they can do that if they want to.

So, finally he said to me” give me a paper.” And, I gave him a sheet of paper and he wrote a word down and made me repeat it three or four times. And, he said, “if you meet a Māorii, say this word.”

Elzora Martin - New Zealand Māori

Māori originally came from Polynesia, and, as I say, they had no hint of trouble with the government. And, we luckily made friends with them, and luckily they were very kind to us. And as I say, they went out of their way to invite us to go with them and things like that. So, I think we had a wonderful trip to New Zealand.

Elzora Martin - The Mauri Lady in New Zealand

A little later on, there was a Mauri lady who was making corn in some sofa springs. And, I decided I would go up and try this word. I figured it was a fifty fifty chance. She was a lady and I was a lady and if we had to fight it out, we could. But, she was very nice and she said oh, you’re a friend! Which surprised me because Mauris don’t accept people…white people as friends. So, all of a sudden she gave me the corn, we tried that. And, then we joined a group that was going where they did dances and things for the tourists. And when that was over, I was very surprised when about four or five Mauris come running over to me to hug me . The lady who was getting me the corn saw that I was there and she told them. So we, I had a little group of Mauris around me.

Mayruth Wolfe

I have a woman that lives here, and she comes out and visits quite a bit. On her 80th birthday she went down and bought a brand new Dodge suburban. I said, “Now, that’s an optimist!”

Mayruth: When we’d go on cruises, and we used to go on a lot of them. We would take a nap in the afternoon so we could stay up late at night. The other old people were so busy on the ship because there were shows and free drinks and casinos and everything on the ship. But we would take a nap so we could stay up late. And every night about 9 o’clock they would have the ‘Honeymoon Show’ and we got to be on it as the longest married couple.  You know, they would pick the ones that just got married that day on the ship, or a week, or what, and then they would pick which ever one they liked. And then the oldest married couple. So every cruise, we would get to be on that because most people that were married as long as us were in bed asleep!

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Virginia Poethig

I ate in a restaurant down on the island, and there was a bug in my sandwich, a dead one.

Wisconsin

Janet Beaulieu

Janet Beaulieu with her dogWe got in there and I went and sat with him. He was real, real, real, good until he saw a mouse. He was chasing that mouse around! You would have thought he was a monkey or something.

Janet: Me and my brother Isaac were the closest. My brother that was two years younger than me. He was kind of a little devil. I can remember walking to school with him one time. He was, well like I said, a couple years younger than me. I can remember when his hands and feet got so cold that he passed out and so I had to go sit with him in the sick room. They called it a sick room because it was just a little tiny room where people went when they didn’t feel good. We got in there and I went and sat with him. He was real, real, real, good until he saw a mouse. He was chasing that mouse around! You would have thought he was a monkey or something. I told him, you’ve got to behave yourself you’re supposed to be sick and he said “well, there ain’t no mouse that’s going to be running all over me!”

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Ruby Sims

I am very thankful for the parents I had. Very thankful for the parents I had. Not everyone can say that.

Ruby: My name is Ruby Ann Sims, and I am a piano teacher, or was a piano teacher. I haven’t been doing it for a while, but I can still do it. I am just thankful for what the Lord has allowed me to do. He has always been a big part of my life. (Piano music Ruby playing in 2016 at Marla Vista Assisted Living Community in Green Bay, Wisconsin)

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Bob Brophy

…and here comes a sailboat south… here’s a man and woman on board stark naked sailing the ship, and He says “Hi how are you, what’s going on?” They were buck naked… I was so stunned…. It made me forget my good manners.

Bob Brophy: After the storm was over we went in on the inland. We got on the canal and went out into Virginia…oh damn, my memory is failing me, but anyway we were sailing just the two of us on a yacht going north up this canal; and here comes a sailboat south, and as we passed about 20 feet apart, here’s a man and woman on board stark naked sailing the ship, and He says “Hi how are you, what’s going on?” They were buck naked. What am I going to talk about to these people? I didn’t’ have enough good manners to wish them a good trip too. I was so stunned. I remembered that all my life. It made me forget my good manners.

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